Buying a fishing rod licence


 

 

If you’re new to fishing and fancy having a go don’t make the mistake of assuming you don’t need a fishing rod licence. 

Did you know? 

 

“You need a rod fishing licence to fish for salmon, trout, freshwater fish, smelt or eel with a rod and line in:

  • England (except the River Tweed)
  • Wales
  • the Border Esk region of Scotland

You must always carry your rod fishing licence when you’re fishing or you could be prosecuted.”

It isn’t worth getting caught without one as you may be fined up to £2500. 

Follow this link to get yours, remember! there are exceptions so make sure you get the correct information from the .gov website.

 

 

 



New National Angling Strategy.


‘A new National Angling Strategy has been launched to encourage greater participation in the sport by focusing on the health and well-being benefits that angling can bring.

 

EA Chair Emma Howard Boyd sitting beside water holding a fishing rod during an angling coaching session with Carl Nye, Project Manager for Get Hooked on Fishing

Environment Agency Chair Emma Howard Boyd

 

The National Angling Strategy (2019-2024) was launched today by Environment Agency Chair Emma Howard Boyd, with members of the angling community, and representatives of the Angling Trust at Get Hooked on Fishing’s Northala Fields venue in Northolt, West London.

The strategy will be implemented by a new partnership body – the National Angling Strategy Partnership Board, coordinated by the Angling Trust with representatives from the Environment Agency, Angling Trades Association, Get Hooked on Fishing and Canal and River Trust.

The strategy was developed by technology and research company Substance after widespread consultation with the angling community and using feedback from the national angling survey that was conducted in 2018 which received 35,000 responses. The responses included the need to make more information available on where and how to fish and the need to emphasise the mental health and physical fitness benefits of fishing.

Environment Agency Chair Emma Howard Boyd said:

“The National Angling Strategy aims to get more people out to experience angling – because we know that getting outdoors and experiencing nature is good for health and wellbeing.

I’m really pleased that the Environment Agency is working with partners and anglers on this exciting vision for growing the sport and delivering the best possible angling experience in England.”

Aims and Objectives of the National Angling Strategy

  • Objective 1 – Develop awareness and knowledge of angling. A marketing campaign, backed by research, with new information on how and where to fish.
  • Objective 2- Increase participation in angling An increase in angling participation by 2024 and increases in females, young people and BAME communities taking part.
  • Objective 3 – Develop social benefits through angling An increase in people getting physically active through angling, delivery of angling for health programmes; and an angling volunteer programme.
  • Objective 4 – Develop Sustainable Places to Fish Involve anglers more in environmental improvement work and science, develop more local and accessible places for people to fish and develop more community waters.
  • Objective 5 – Increase Angling’s Economic Impact Deliver a trade-backed market development plan, new funding for developing the angling sector and tackle shop and angling tourism support.
  • Objective 6 – Understand angling data and evidence Develop an angling research programme to inform future actions, stakeholders and angling commerce interests, and to evaluate the strategy’s success.

Source : .gov Read the rest of this entry »



First Meeting with new Chairman/CEO.


On June 6th 2019 the first general meeting (of the Angling Trades Associations members) chaired by John Loftus as Chairman/CEO commenced. Attended also by Mike Heylin Vice Chairman the meeting had a strong turn out from key players in the industry.

The members of The Angling Trades Association discussed a variety of topics concerning the association, the industry and shared ideas and thoughts for the vital progression of our sport and its future.

We look forward to the next meeting in the coming months.

If you would like to actively promote angling, contribute to its longevity and future then become a member



Wild Weather and Wide Smiles


The Game Fair 1

The infamous British weather tried its very best to confuse the public last weekend for the launch of National Fishing Month (NFM). Despite blistering heat, high velocity winds and even lashings of rain, NFM events kicked off in style, bringing instant joy and lasting memories to the many people who took part.

At a showcase NFM event at The Game Fair at Ragley Hall, near Evesham, coaching teams from The Professional Anglers Association and the Game Angling Instructors Association battled the wild weather conditions to give free coaching sessions to hundreds of youngsters and adults alike, often with whole families having a go, to cast a fly line or catch a fish on the lake. Some fabulous fish were caught, and there were wide smiles on the faces of the happy participants.

In addition to offering coaching sessions, Nick Watkins (PAA) and Rob Doyle (GAIA) spoke about getting new people into fishing at the Fishing Theatre in the centre of Fishing Village. Nick commented: ‘The audiences were great and were certainly interested and engaging.’  Rob added: ‘The Game Fair organisers deserve hearty congratulations for recognising the importance of recruiting new anglers and for providing such a fabulous public platform to showcase how we carry out our coaching.’

Everyone who took part in a coaching session went home with a NFM ‘goody bag’ containing the ‘Get Into Fishing’ booklet full of information on how to get started and advice on different types of fishing, a log book to make a note of their first catches and a special certificate as a memento of their days free fishing.

There are still hundreds of free events available to attend nationwide, listed online at www.nationalfishingmonth.com so there’ll be a participating venue close to everyone. Taking part is simplicity itself – just need to register online and then turn up. Everything will be provided without charge, and most people will experience the ultimate thrill of catching their first fish under the watchful guidance of their coach.
National Fishing Month 2018 runs between 27th July and 2nd September.



ANGLING TRADE WARNS OF UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES


The Angling Trades Association (ATA) has submitted to Government a detailed consultation document in response to the proposed Animal Welfare (Sentencing and Recognition of Sentience) Bill. If it becomes law, this legislation is intended to not only fill any vacuum left in welfare provision once Brexit occurs; according to Michael Gove, Secretary of State for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs, it will form “… the start of our ambition to set a global gold standard for animal welfare as we leave the EU”.

 

Scientific experts, including ATA Chief Executive Dr Bruno Broughton, have advised that the proposed new Bill includes several key aspects which are of significant concern because of the possible unintended and serious consequences that may arise from them. They occur in the draft text in the repeated statements that:

“animals are sentient beings”

and that:

“Ministers must have regard to matters affecting the public interest”.

 

As currently drafted, the scope of the proposed Bill encompasses all animals, without exclusion based on phylum or class. From a scientific perspective, the same degree of enhanced legal protection would be granted to – say – single-celled Amoeba, parasitic fleas, nematode worms and barnacles as that afforded to great apes and ‘companion animals’. It is difficult to visualise how this might apply without potentially huge and adverse implications on most spheres of human activity.

 

It could be argued that the Bill should cover only specified, more evolutionarily-advanced animal groups such as vertebrates or so-called ‘warm-blooded’ animals. Such restrictions have considerable merit because they would be more practical, simplify enforcement and restrict potential costs. The Bill should clearly define what animals it covers and which are excluded.

 

In Western philosophy, animal sentience is usually understood as the ability to perceive or feel things, or to experience sensations. This does not mean that sentience is intrinsically linked to the emotional abilities of animals – their capabilities to experience pain or pleasure, for example; rather, it implies that animals are capable of detecting and reacting to external stimuli.

 

This does not signify that fish are incapable of complex behaviour, but it does demonstrate that, anatomically, fish do not have the ability to experience pain or pleasure. This is also the case with many other classes of animals. If the word ‘sentience’ is to be retained within the Bill, it is essential that its definition is precise and legally robust.

 

Moreover, as currently drafted, the Bill would apply to all animals, irrespective of whether they are ‘kept’ or not, and as such it would cover stillwater, riverine and marine fish. Naidre Werner, ATA Chair commented:

“If Section 59 of the Animal Welfare Act is revisited or if a similar section is added to the current Bill, there should be a clearly stated exemption for recreational fishing in fresh water and marine waters”.

 

Dr Broughton warned of the likelihood of unintended and dangerous consequences arising from the Bill.

“Good fish welfare is at the very heart of angling because the sport relies on healthy fish and sustainable fish populations.   However, as currently drafted, the Bill would be a hostage to fortune and enshrine in law what would amount to animal rights legislation. This could be disastrous for millions of citizens and for huge sections of British industry, commerce and recreation, including our own. “

 

The ATA is committed to ongoing dialogue with Defra to push for a sensible approach to redrafting the Bill, thereby ensuring that it is fit for its intended purpose.



National Angling & Fisheries Advisory Group New Appointees


New appointments are being appointed to the National Angling & Fisheries Advisory Group (NAAG).

The group is responsible for advising on the Canal and River Trust activities, as they work on improving fishery conditions along the 2,000 miles of waterways it cares for.

  • Ian Trayer replaces David Kent as chairman
  • David will remain as a group member.
  • Rod Bracey and John Johnson step down in July 2017
  • Kye Jerrom and Andy Strickland will replace them

Ian Trayer: A lifelong angler who these days focuses on catching specimen fish both at home and abroad. Ian is a retired professor of biochemistry with a specific interest in water quality and molecular biology. He remains active at club level with Barnt Green Fisheries who manage the fishing at the Trust-owned Bittell Reservoir complex.

Kye Jerrom: An Environment Agency fisheries technical specialist in the Anglian region, Kye has a wealth of knowledge of technical fisheries issues. A former level 2 angling coach, he remains an active match angling participant representing the Browning Hotrods team in the nation’s most prestigious angling events.

Andy Strickland: A former chartered accountant, Andy is secretary of the Prince Albert Angling Society, the UK’s largest fishing club. As well as having fisheries interests on various Trust canals and reservoirs, Andy manages a portfolio of over 200 fisheries from South Wales north to the Scottish borders. Through Andy, the society have carried out significant volunteering work on their fisheries.

The roles are three year terms. The NAAG meets three times a year and in the coming 12 months the group will be looking at how to encourage a new generation of anglers through its Go Fish campaign. The project examines the issue of non-native invasive species on the waterways, and improves the environmental appraisal process to better serve both fisheries and angling clubs.

as they work on improving fishery conditions along the 2,000 miles of waterways it cares for.

  • Ian Trayer replaces David Kent as chairman
  • David will remains as a group member.
  • Rod Bracey and John Johnson step down in July 2017
  • Kye Jerrom and Andy Strickland will replace them

Ian Trayer: A lifelong angler who these days focuses on catching specimen fish both at home and abroad. Ian is a retired professor of biochemistry with a specific interest in water quality and molecular biology. He remains active at club level with Barnt Green Fisheries who manage the fishing at the Trust-owned Bittell Reservoir complex.

Kye Jerrom: An Environment Agency fisheries technical specialist in the Anglian region, Kye has a wealth of knowledge of technical fisheries issues. A former level 2 angling coach, he remains an active match angling participant representing the Browning Hotrods team in the nation’s most prestigious angling events.

Andy Strickland: A former chartered accountant, Andy is secretary of the Prince Albert Angling Society, the UK’s largest fishing club. As well as having fisheries interests on various Trust canals and reservoirs, Andy manages a portfolio of over 200 fisheries from South Wales north to the Scottish borders. Through Andy, the society have carried out significant volunteering work on their fisheries.

The roles are three-year terms. The NAAG meets three times a year and in the coming 12 months the group will be looking at how to encourage a new generation of anglers through its Go Fish campaign. The project examines the issue of non-native invasive species on the waterways, and improves the environmental appraisal process to better serve both fisheries and angling clubs.



Going Large At The Big One


Professional Anglers Association (PAA) coaches Tony Forman and Dave Brown, together with directors Roger Smith and Paul Forman, worked tirelessly over the weekend of The Big One Show to raise £683.86 for charitable purposes. The tackle raffle they ran was in aid of the Angling Participation Fund, which finances worthy angling causes throughout the UK.

During the two days the coaches were in the hot, tented venue they had a hectic time keeping on top of the raffle, making up a never-ending stream of prize bags and dealing with general coaching and fishing enquiries.
Paul said: ‘It was a cracking couple of days.  The team at The Big One really know how to put on a great show, which was packed on both days.  Thanks to the numbers of visitors coming through the doors, we raised an outstanding amount of money for the Angling Participation Fund.’

Paul added: ’Huge thanks also go out to the Angling Trades Association (ATA) members who supported our raffle by donating prizes.  We had some wonderful goodies to give away from Angling Direct, Fishing Republic, Fox International, Les Webber’s Angling Projects, Pure Fishing, Reuben Heaton and Svendson Sports. Their support was very much appreciated and undoubtedly helped us exceed our fund-raising goal.’

The Angling Participation Fund is a not-for-profit company that has been created by members of the ATA to encourage and secure contributions from both the trade and outside revenue sources in order to provide financial support to angling projects and initiatives across the UK.  The company is currently going through the process of becoming a registered charity, and it is hoped that this will be achieved shortly.

The Professional Anglers Association (PAA) is a major support organisation for a nationwide network of fully qualified, accredited and licensed angling coaches, who themselves recruit and teach thousands of new and budding anglers each year. If you are a fisherman and would like to know more about becoming an angling coach, please visit the PAA website www.paauk.co.uk or the Angling Trust website www.anglingtrust.net, or email info@paauk.co.uk for more information.



Celebrate the outdoors with the National Fishing Month Silver Jubilee


Did you know that just about anybody can learn to fish? Fishing really is a four-season leisure pastime, and one of its joys is that in each season there are different and exciting fish to catch.

Fishing transports you to the heart of nature and the many, intriguing plants and animals that live there. By attending an organised event this summer during the National Fishing Month Silver Jubilee, you could experience the joys of fishing yourself.

Angling takes you into the fresh, unpolluted air, promoting healthy lung function and a sense of well-being. Recent research clearly shows that getting out on the bank can be good for you and the family. These health benefits also extend to the mind, and angling is well-known for its therapeutic, mental effects.   It really is a perfect hobby to get you away from the daily stresses faced by both time-poor adults and children growing up in the twenty first century.

Dean Macey at National Fishing MonthDean Macey, Olympian and Big Fish Off presenter (pictured centre) has no doubt about why he is an enthusiastic angler: “I have been fishing for as long as I can remember and wherever I go in the world, I will always bump into someone who also loves fishing. It’s such a great hobby – you get to spend time outdoors, appreciate Mother Nature, meet some great people and, if you’re lucky, witness some marvellous creatures at close hand.”

Dean continued: “When I was a kid, I found it hard to get my head around school work or any kind of discipline. If it wasn’t for fishing and athletics I dread to think where I would be right now. Between them, they gave me something to focus on and kept me off the streets.

“Throughout my athletics career, fishing helped me unwind mentally and I’m sure without it, I would have burnt myself out. Whether it’s a day on a river, sleeping under the stars on a stillwater for a few days or jumping on a plane to fuel my passion abroad, I don’t mind, I love it all.  That’s why I support National Fishing Month and urge everyone to get involved and take part. Everyone I have ever taken fishing has fallen in love with the sport. Give it a go – you owe it to yourself!”

It doesn’t matter what age you start. Children can take part on equal terms with their grandparents. You can fish alone, with friends or in an organised group for an hour or two or for a whole day – you have the freedom to choose.

Enjoy yourself this summer, get outdoors and get healthy – take part in a National Fishing Month registered event and follow thousands of young people, parents, grandparents and friends who enjoy quality family time together at the waterside over the holiday period. Book your place now at www.nationalfishingmonth.com.

For 25 years now, National Fishing Month has helped introduce nearly 300,000 people into the incredible sport of angling. It’s a hugely satisfying way to strengthen relationships and get active together, and it often leads to lasting participation in and a passion for angling.

National Fishing Month 2017 runs between 21st July and 3rd September.



In It To Win It!


A Chess board of Business people. Business strategy concept

The Angling Trades Association has welcomed the recent, successful House of Commons Debate on Bass, secured by Scott Mann (Conservative MP for North Cornwall and a sea angler). The motion stated: ‘that this House believes that the recent EU restrictions on recreational sea bass fishing are unfair and fail to address the real threat to the future viability of UK sea bass stocks; and calls on the Government to make representations within the Council of the EU on the reconsideration of the imposition of those restrictions’.

Now put your hand on your heart and ask yourself – did you really do your best as members of the angling trade, and as individual anglers, to add your voice and support the debate?

Historically, the factual value of recreational sea angling to the trade and the economy speak for themselves. The Drew Report into sea angling in 2003 stated that £538 million pounds was spent annually by 1.1 million sea anglers. The CEFAS report for Defra titled ‘Sea Angling 2012’ revealed that there were 884,000 recreational sea anglers in England, directly spending £1.23 billion per annum (£2.1 billion including induced and indirect impacts). After deductions for tax and imports, the direct annual expenditure was calculated to be £831 million. The VAT receipts received by the Treasury were £166 million p.a. and bass angling was calculated to be worth £200 million each year in England alone.

In 2015 the Blue Marine Foundation published a report ‘Defining the Economic & Environmental Values of Sea Bass’, focussing on Sussex. It revealed that sea anglers fishing in the county spent £31.3 million on tackle, charter boats and hotels, creating 353 full-time jobs whilst retaining just 15 tonnes of bass. In the latest ‘Tackle Trade Survey 2015’ published by the Angling Trades Association, which reported on research into the value of the UK sales of tackle and associated equipment (rods, reels, line, bait, lures, clothing and accessories), sea angling accounted for 10.63% of sales (£60.7 million of the total annual sales figure of £570.4 million).

So why are we in this position now? Naidre Werner, Chair of the Angling Trades Association (ATA), thinks the answer is simple:

‘We aren’t shouting loudly enough, either as businesses working within the sector or as individual anglers. We don’t need to get embroiled in a fight with the commercial fisherman – our immense value in numbers speaks out for itself. But what we do need to do is add our voices to the messages that the Angling Trust (AT), BASS and the European Anglers Alliance (EAA) are trying to get across.

‘It doesn’t matter what your personal opinion is of these organisations or their teams of people. The fact remains that the Angling Trust is the recognised National Governing Body for anglers in England and the EAA is the recognised body for anglers in Europe, and they are the organisations that are being invited to sit in front of the right people in Parliament (both in the UK and the EU) to put across our opinions.

‘Defra, Cefas and the Council of the EU have absolutely no interest in trawling fishing forums late at night to find ‘relevant’ comments and useful information written by ‘keyboard warriors’… I don’t blame them.’

Naidre continued: ‘So we need to be in it to win it – together. If as angling businesses and angling individuals we support the organisations that are there to represent our interests, then this will only add decibels to the noise we make.’

The ATA is urging all sea anglers, businesses involved in sea angling and sympathetic individuals to support the Angling Trust’s campaign by emailing the EU Commissioner, Karmenu Vella, with a short message of support. The email address is karmenu.vella@ec.europa.eu. Please also copy David Mitchell of the Angling Trust on your email: david.mitchell@anglingtrust.net.

It won’t take long to write a message, but it could save your hobby, your job or your business!



It’s in the bag


Angling Directs NFM Bag for Life

Angling Directs NFM Bag for Life

Angling Direct has joined the 5p bag scheme… but with a big difference. In conjunction with the Angling Trades Association (ATA) – of which the company is a member – ALL proceeds generated from sales of Angling Direct carrier bags will go directly towards supporting National Fishing Month (NFM).

The scheme also aims to reduce the discarding of single-use plastic carrier bags within the angling trade, and the litter associated with them, by encouraging people to re-use their bags when they go shopping. Angling Direct will soon be introducing their own version of the hessian ‘Bag for Life.’ Again all money raised will go towards National Fishing Month.

Naidre Werner, NFM Co-Ordinator and ATA Chair commented: ‘It’s fabulous that Angling Direct is supporting National Fishing Month in this way and I am very grateful for their commitment. Without a doubt, the money raised from this idea will contribute significantly to the NFM coffers and hopefully encourage other members of the trade to come up with equally creative ways of supporting what is angling’s largest participation initiative.’

Darren Bailey, MD for Angling Direct added: ‘As enthusiastic members of the Angling Trades Association, it made sense to support National Fishing Month. Participation initiatives like NFM are designed to attract newcomers into our sport and with more anglers; there is greater protection for our fisheries and the ecosystem in general. Attracting new anglers means more future customers and so it makes perfect business sense to generate money that can be donated to this type of initiative. Over the next few months, the team at Angling Direct are taking a much closer look at how we can help grow our sport, as it is vital that retailers, manufacturers and organisations work together to protect our futures. Over the next five years, Angling Direct will run out a number of grass roots initiatives that underpin the growth of the angling community, support the environment and demonstrate our commitment to business growth and our employees. ’

National Fishing Month 2016 runs between 22nd July and 29th August. Further details can be found at www.nationalfishingmonth.com



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